Get to know us

We here at Mindful Path Psychology are deeply influenced by mindfulness and person-centered approaches, emphasizing the importance of each person's voice and their individual path in life.

 

We know that our clients have unique needs, so our clinicians are equipped to meet those individual needs, based on their own personal experience and expertise.

We are a diverse group of people that honor diversity in all of its forms.

We are a culturally sensitive organization that supports 

queer and gender-affirming teens and adults. 

Dr. Joseph Atanasio, Psy.D.

Clinical Psychologist | Founder

Pronouns: he/him/his

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When it comes down to it, one of the greatest issues that therapists disagree on is personal disclosure with clients. Some therapists believe that any significant amount of disclosure on the therapist's part can be harmful to the therapeutic process, creating an enmeshment of unnecessary emotional impact for both the therapist and client.

Some therapists are looser in their disclosure, maybe at times sharing very personal life experiences. This can be an essential rapport and trust building moment when the timing is right.

In my own practice, I make strong attempts to balance what I share of personal experience, and what I feel needs to be worked through by the Client on their own. I point this out because the following is an essential part of me as a Clinician. I firmly believe that if a genuine and authentic clinical relationship is to be established between my clients and I, they should know and understand my intentions as a therapist, and the responsibility of confidentiality I hold as sacred.

 
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“When a genuine and trusting clinical relationship is established between‪ my clients and me, they know and understand my intentions, and the responsibility of confidentiality I hold as sacred.”

Cultivating a space of 

self-actualization

Dr. Joseph Atanasio, Psy.D.
Clinical Psychologist & Founder,

I work from a person-centered therapeutic approach that aims to quiet the voice of the therapist and bolster your ability to practice radical self-acceptance. 

 

I am deeply moved by the lessons of Zen meditation, and I integrate those principles into my approach as a clinician— encouraging self-actualization through thought-awareness.

 

Our work together will emphasize the depth of your lived experience and increase your ability to reclaim your emotional health. I support your cultivation of patience and grace in an effort to nurture the body and mind.

 

The goal of my work is to facilitate a space of vulnerability and accountability so that you can recognize how to operate with increased emotional tolerance.

Kya Richards, LMSW

Licensed Master Social Worker

Pronouns: she/her/they

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Navigating life and transitioning through ups and downs can be very difficult. We at times feel fear, frustration, and confusion but suppress those emotions because we think it will pass. This causes a great strain on our self-development and self-care. As we embark on these new stages of change in our lives, it is important to maintain awareness, avoid self-neglect, and engage in self-compassion. In trying to keep everything afloat you may feel like you’re drowning in the process. Allow me to extend a life jacket for you.

My work aligns with treatment approaches and principles rooted in cognitive behavioral therapy, person-centered therapy, and mindfulness therapy. In conjunction, these modalities help clients take incremental steps towards the behavior change they seek by reshaping their thinking in an environment that is non-judgmental and tailored to their strengths.

I work with clients on increasing emotional awareness and becoming more present-moment focused. This helps in reducing negative self-judgment and alleviates stressors and mental blocks that hinder growth. Allow me to support you in discovering the tools and capabilities you have within yourself. Let’s work together in building the best version of you.

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Arnild Moise, MHC-LP

Mental Health Counselor

Pronouns: he/him/his